Phylicia Rashād on the legacy of the AKAs highlighted in the ‘Twenty Pearls’ documentary – CNN

https://www.cnn.com/2021/04/05/entertainment/phylicia-rashad-twenty-pearls-documentary/index.html

She walked 2,000 miles: Bridget “Biddy” Mason (U.S. National Park Service)

https://www.nps.gov/people/biddymason.htm

Perhaps the earliest Black woman to amass wealth and settle in Los Angeles

Why revisiting grief in the public spotlight is tragic

I know what it’s like when the ‘weight of the world’ seems put upon your shoulders yet few people around you want to help carry the load.

My friend, Gwen Carr, knows well this heavy feeling. She is the mother of Eric Garner, the New York man who received an acknowledged, illegal chokehold by a police officer for selling single cigarettes. Selling cigarettes in this increment is against the law and the husband, son, father and community retailer, died after crying out,”I can’t breathe.”

It’s hard for Carr and other family members to breathe after learning the Justice Department will not charge the police officer who allegedly placed the chokehold on Garner that was found to stimulate death for the cigarette vendor. Five years nearly to the day that Garner died, Carr had to hold another impromptu press conference and lead the charge to ask that the police officer be fired by the city of New York.

I know it hurts. Carr has spent each anniversary of her son’s July death with fellow Moms who were pushed in the public commentary because of the deaths of their sons by persons assigned to “serve and protect them.” In their collective anger, the women have channeled their energy to help one another. The annual gathering was Carr’s idea and each year, she has shouldered the burden of travel and hotel costs and logistical planning.

Carr and her sisters in this sad bond, seek to rise above the injustices as they form a I applaud the women whose names have become household words because of the tragedies. In nearly all of the public cases resulting in deaths for their loved ones, questions loudly arise on whether justice was served for the families and communities.proverbial circle to laugh, share, cry, forgive and live for brighter days. The New York Times agrees that justice still hangs in the balance for Garner. See www.nytimes.com/2019/07/16/opinion/eric-garner-pantaleo.html.

I applaud the women whose names have become household words because of the tragedies. In nearly all of the public cases resulting in deaths for their loved ones, questions loudly arise on whether justice was served for the families and communities.

Want to help their healing?

$quared, $CashApp, $garnerwayfoundation

or

Garner Foundation c/o Gwen Carr

“Weekend to Breathe”

P.O. Box 20502

Staten Island, NY 10302